The Kentucky House has passed a controversial bill that’s aimed at giving parents more control over what their kids are taught in school. Lawmakers debated the bill for close to two hours late Wednesday night. The bill ultimately passed 80-18 mostly along party lines. The bill requires school districts to create a process to challenge instructional materials that parents deem “harmful” to children. Under the measure, parents would submit a complaint to the school principal, who would decide whether the materials in dispute would remain, be removed or be restricted. Parents disagreeing with that decision could appeal to the local school board. Parents disagreeing with the school board’s decision could choose to opt out their children from exposure to the disputed material. Opponents have called SB5 a “book ban bill” but the bill’s sponsor in the House, Rep. Russell Webber of Shepherdsville, disagrees.”You may hear this is a book banning, this is not a book banning bill. This is a bill designed to give parents an opportunity to voice their concerns and to protect their children,” Webber said. . Tina Bojanowski of Louisville spoke against the bill. “Every child deserves to see himself in the literature available in our schools. this is not a necessary bill. This is fueling the flames of a culture war and our children will suffer the consequences,” Bojanowski said. Rep. Josh Calloway filed several floor amendments including one that added language banning drag shows, but those amendments failed. The bill now heads to Gov. Andy Beshear’s desk.

The Kentucky House has passed a controversial bill that’s aimed at giving parents more control over what their kids are being taught in school.

Lawmakers debated the bill for close to two hours late Wednesday night. The bill ultimately passed 80-18 mostly along party lines.

The bill requires school districts to create a process to challenge instructional materials that parents deem “harmful” to children.

Under the measure, parents would submit a complaint to the school principal, who would decide whether the materials in dispute would remain, be removed or be restricted. Parents disagreeing with that decision could appeal to the local school board.

Parents disagreeing with the school board’s decision could choose to opt out of their children from exposure to the disputed material.

Opponents have called SB5 a “book ban bill” but the bill’s sponsor in the House, Rep. Russell Webber of Shepherdsville, disagrees.

“You may hear this is a book banning, this is not a book banning bill. This is a bill designed to give parents an opportunity to voice their concerns and protect their children,” Webber said.

Rep. Tina Bojanowski of Louisville spoke against the bill.

“Every child deserves to see himself in the literature available in our schools. This is not a necessary bill. This is fueling the flames of a culture war and our children will suffer the consequences,” Bojanowski said.

Rep. Josh Calloway filed several floor amendments including one that added language banning drag shows, but those amendments failed.

The bill now heads to Gov. Andy Beshear’s desk.

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